Skip to main content

#AuthorApril: O is for Lauren Oliver #AtoZChallenge

Dear Alison,

We've climbed up the #AtoZChallenge peak like rock climbing divas, and now, we begin our descent down the back half of the alphabet, but like my climb in the Grand Canyon, we must carefully watch our step for snakes, negotiate turns, and be wary of always stepping down on the same leg. Drinking and eating are important too--if you find you're hungry or thirsty on your hike--it's TOO late, so Alison, grab a chai and a chocolate bar too, (Professor Lupus knew what he was doing when he gave a chocolate bar to Harry--Chocolate IS magic) and settle in for O is for Lauren Oliver. 

Life is about choices, and when you're in junior and high school, every decision feels like a defining moment. 

I remember back to 7th grade. It was my first day in junior high, and I went down to the cafeteria with a person I was friendly with in elementary school, that is to say we knew each other since kindergarten, but I wouldn't call us "friends." Anyway, we walked into the crowded lunch room and a few field hockey friends of hers waved her over to the stage, she asked me if I wanted to come. At that moment, I knew, I knew my decision would define me for the remainder of junior high. I could sit with the cool kids, the popular kids, (even in seventh grade I knew who they were destined to be), or I could sit with my friends from elementary school in all their awkward, brace-ridden, nerdy awesomeness--the girls who I had sleepovers with and watched Nightmare on Elm Street and Children of the Corn when we weren't studying Seventeen magazine for the latest makeup tips. 

In that split second, I knew I couldn't leave my friends behind. I declined the invitation and headed over to the table teeming with smiley friendly faces. My friends, my cherished group of friends, were everything to me. Sure, some "friends" from the group stared longingly at the stage and when given the opportunity, they grabbed their bags, moved to the stage, and changed for better or for worse--it's not for me to say. I made my choice.

Lauren Oliver examines choices in her novel, Before I Fall.  

Picture and Blurb from http://www.laurenoliverbooks.com/delirium.php


Sam Kingston has everything… except time. When February 12th turns out to be her last day, Sam gets a unique opportunity to use her death to change her life.

Samantha Kingston isn't nice at the beginning of the novel. She doesn't even try to be friendly to most of her classmates including her teachers--she wears a mask, a carefully constructed mask, to hide the insecure, awkward geek from elementary school. 

Samantha was offered the same choice I was, but she chose the cool girls. She made choices through high school she's not proud of. She sacrificed friendships. She made fun of people. She was a bitch to everyone who wasn't in the "circle." 

But on the "big" night, the night she planned to give her virginity away to her not-so-nice boyfriend, the night she left a party with a carload of her drunk "bestest" friends, one of whom was driving, was her last night. She died in a car accident, but her story didn't end. She's forced to relive her last day until she gets it right. 

No spoilers here, but if you're a fan of contemporary fiction, Before I Fall is one you should check out. 

Sharing the writing love one letter at a time,

Kim









Popular posts from this blog

INTERVIEW with Juliana Spink Mills, Author of The Blade Hunt Chronicles

Dear Alison and friends,
Today, I am excited. I mean REALLY excited, because well, I got to hangout with my writer buddy Juliana Spink Mills via the modern way: email/twitter/IG/FB. Juliana and I met at the NYSCBWI conference a few years back and have been friends every since. Juliana has been a much better friend to me than I've been to her this past year, but my resolution for 2018 is to rid myself of some of the extra responsibilities (stay tuned for details) and focus on what's really important supporting my community and that includes my writing community and the most important components of my writing community other than my readers are my writer friends.


So Juliana, when did you start writing?
Although I’ve always liked messing around with words, I didn’t start writing ‘for real’ until I turned 40 and told myself to stop procrastinating.
Sounds like 40 was the kick in the ass you needed. I just gave myself a strict deadline to finish my current WIP by January 1st. Deadline…

THE GIRL WITH THE RED BALLOON: Review, Interview, and GIVEAWAY!

Dear Kim (and friends),


Today's post is a package within a package within a package.
I bring you a
book review,
interview,
and giveaway,
all wrapped into one post.


On the blog today we welcome Katherine Locke, author, cat wrangler, and YA book advocate. Recently Katherine and I connected on stage at the annual Fall Philly SCBWI Conference. We talked activism, writing, and I fanned all over her new book, The Girl with the Red Balloon.

Prior to Philly, I followed Katherine’s blog, reading her posts about character and writing, and her journey to publication. I also participated in monthly GAY YA (now YA PRIDE) book talks on Twitter where she sometimes moderated, and often participated, I also followed her on Twitter for her insights into this crazy *** world.  Then, just prior to her book's release YA Reads connected us via their 2017 Debut Author Bash so that we could host a giveaway of The Girl With the Red Balloon here. 

I mean, even for me, that's a lot of background, jus…

INTERVIEW WITH K.M. WALTON, YA FEST & HARRY POTTER

Dear Alison and readers, Have I got a surprise for you...Guess who stopped by to chat? Any guesses? No peeking at the title. Wait, I guess it's too late. Okay, I'll tell you anyway, KM Walton, the YA Author of all of these books...




Hi K.M.,

Thanks so much for stopping by to talk to me. Care for a chai latte or a glass of wine? It’s Friday. Let’s go for the wine.
Excellent choice. I’ll have one as well. So tell me, when did you become a writer? Despite my debut novel releasing when I was 44, my stacks of journals from childhood onward prove that I’ve always been a writer.
Yeah, it took me a while to figure out what I really wanted to be when I grew up. The bulging folder filled with scraps of paper and napkins of all my “book” ideas and “story” ideas didn’t make me realize my true calling until six or seven years ago. So tell me, what do you love about writing? Possibility. I’m a wildly anticipatory person, always have been. A dreamer for sure. Writing, with all of its glorious poss…