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#AuthorApril: K is for Kendare Blake in our #AtoZChallenge

Dear Alison,

I don't know whether to hug you or plot against you. Your last two entries blew me away. First, you began with H is for Hope, Ashley Hope Perez. Your review of Out of Darkness went straight to the jugular: 

"Say what you want about prologues, Kim, but reading the prologue to Hope Perez's award-winning historical fiction is a litmus test to see if you can emotionally handle this haunting novel. If you can pull through the prologue without your heart crumbling to nothing, you might be strong enough to continue reading."

Litmus test? That was a brilliant stroke of genius. How could anyone not want to read Out of Darkness after your book review, if only to see if they can pass the litmus test?

I thought I brought my A-game with I is for INKSpell Publishing Authors, but really I didn't do anything--I just showcased the amazing talent of INKSpell Publishing. 

Then Tuesday evening came, and you sent me J is for Julie Murphy. What a gift. I opened that post and DEVOURED every last red dress. It made me want to go out and buy a red dress of my own after I re-read Dumpin'. I wish I pre-ordered so I could wear the pin, but alas I did not. I'll just stare enviously at yours.

So now, it's my turn. K is for Kendare Blake. The horror author of mythic proportions who brought us: Anna Dressed in Blood, 

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Girl of Nightmares, 

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The Goddess War Series: Antigoddess, Mortal Gods, Ungodly. 


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and her most recent, The Dark Crowns.

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I read Anna Dressed in Blood after a woman my mom, a children's librarian, worked with suggested I might like the series. The woman read the books during Hurricane Sandy, so I, of course, presumed that desperation with the state wide driving ban combined with the act of reading by candlelight might have contributed to an inflated romanticized reading of the book. With a heavy dose of skepticism, I agreed to read the first book--by no means was I ready to commit to a two-book series. 

Alison, it was one of the best decisions I've ever made. I didn't want to LOVE these books--After all, what does a friend of my mom's know about YA books? Evidently, A LOT. I sank my teeth into Anna. Blake drew me in and made me feel like I, too, was a ghost hunter welding a deadly athame to slay the dead. That I, too, fell for a female ghost dressed in blood. I wanted to find out Anna's story. I wanted to know why she chose to scare--No, scare's too tame a word. I wanted to know why she chose to terrorize anyone who stepped foot into her house. I'll give no spoilers here, but I suggest you read it. Actually, I order you to read it.

From Anna, I moved to Girl of NightmaresGirl continued where Anna left off, and that's where I'll leave my review. I dare not spoil it for you.

Blake's fast-paced writing draws you in. She clutches you by the throat and doesn't let go until the last page. Thirsting more for the writer who made me care about a bloody dress, I bought Antigoddess. Antigoddess combines my love of Blake's writing with mythology. 

USA Today's Happy Ever After says it best: 
"This is Kendare Blake we're talking about, so people die, and there are terrible sacrifices. I will be impatiently waiting for the sequel."

So Alison, I hope I brought you joyous wonder with this horror writer.

Sharing the writing love one letter at a time,
Kim


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